Marina Warner

Forthcoming

2021

27 October, 7- 8pm – 100 Days by Gabriel Josipovici: Carcanet Book Launch, Online, £2
Marina Warner will be hosting the launch, joining Gabriel to discuss the new book. The event will feature readings and discussion, and audience members will have the opportunity to ask their own questions. Register here.

‘When in March 2020 the Covid pandemic led the Government to impose a total lockdown Gabriel Josipovici decided that he would respond to a unique situation by writing an essay a day for a hundred days, prefacing each with a diary entry, keeping track of the changing seasons as well as the pandemic. As organising and generating principle for the essays he chose the alphabet, and the result is a stimulating kaleidoscope of topics from Aachen to Zoos, passing by Alexandria, Luciano Berio, Ivy Compton-Burnett, reflections on his own early works The Echo-Chamber and Flow, Langland’s Piers Plowman, the idea of repetition in life and art, and much else.
Josipovici reminds us that he has previously ‘plundered episodes in my life to illustrate the intertwining of memory and forgetting, the desire to remember and the need to forget’, and here he has someone say to him: ‘You don’t seem to be afraid of revealing a great deal about yourself.’ ‘I don’t think I feel it that way,’ he responds. ‘I can “reveal” precisely because it does not seem to be part of me. It seems to belong to someone else, a writer I have lived with, an immigrant I have known.”

November 2021, Witchcraft. The Library of Esoterica, Publication pre-order here.

Front cover of a book entitled WITCHCRAFT, with a painting by Gustav Klimt in colours of blue and green on it

Marina Warner has a piece included in this compendium, the third volume in The Library of Esoterica, a series from TASCHEN books.
The book follows the magickal tradition of witchcraft from its ancient roots to its modern incarnations. Through more than 400 artworks, and revelatory essays and interviews with modern practitioners, Witchcraft chronicles a cathartic evolution, from the craft’s emergence in ancient goddess worship to the embrace by today’s diverse witch community.